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Tag Archives: CAT6

Dec 19

Extending 4K images couldn’t be easier with the 4K HDMI Extender. Using just a single CAT5/6 cable you can extender 4K images up to 55m away. Only one end requires power, as the other end will be powered via PoE. Installation is quick and easy, with no configuration required, simple plug and play.

Based on Technomate’s proprietary technology, you can now watch an HDMI 2.0 4K HDR device up to 55m away in 4:2:0 or up to 35m away in 4:4:4. And it supports HDCP 2.2.

The video and audio are uncompressed, ensuring you the same quality as using an HDMI cable. Full 3D compatibility, Dolby and DTS HD audio are also supported.

A truly smart solution for HDMI CAT Extenders. You only need to power the HDMI Transmitter. The HDMI Receiver requires no power as it will receive the power automatically over the same single CAT cable as the audio & video.

Therefore, you no longer need a power supply next to the HDMI Receiver’s TV. It is also super slim at only 15mm so can be easily hidden from view, behind a TV.

The unique and useful HDMI Loop-through allows the HDMI Transmitter to split the video to a local TV display, saving on the cost and space of a 2-way HDMI Splitter.

There is also bidirectional IR control of the source.

Automatic EDID management is supported to configure handshaking between connected devices.

*Please note, “up to” distances above are based on full copper CAT6 cable. For full copper CAT5e cable, distances will be around 10m less.

Mar 29

Materials needed:  CAT5/5e/6 Cable, RJ45 Plugs, Crimping Tool for RJ45 Plugs, RJ45/Network Cable Tester

To make a Patch Cable using CAT5/5e/6 first, using the cable stripper on the crimp tool, strip about 25mm of the outer jacket to reveal the 4 twisted pairs being careful not to damage the twisted pairs.  A Stanley knife can also be used if the crimp tool does not have a cable stripper. 

Arrange the four twisted pairs as follows from left to right:  Orange White, Orange, Green White, Blue, Blue White, Green, Brown White, Brown. 

Straighten the pairs as much as possible whilst keeping them arranged correctly.  Once the pairs are straightened, trim them down to about 10mm, or enough to allow the RJ45 Wedge to grip the Cable Jacket when crimped, and insert into your RJ45 Plug with Orange White being in Pin Terminal One, Orange being in Pin Terminal Two, Green White in Pin Terminal Three and so on, making sure each of the pairs go into the correct Pin Terminal.

You can now use you crimp tool to crimp the RJ45 Plugs pins into the pairs and the RJ45 Plug wedge onto the jacket of the Cable.

RJ45 pins and pair arrangement shown below

 

After crimping your RJ45 Plugs to each end of your CAT5/5e/6 Patch Cable you’ll need to test the cable to make sure it will work correctly. An RJ45 Tester will test the Patch Cable and indicate if there are any problems with your cable.

If there is an issue with the Cable you’ve made the tester will indicated which end and which pin isn’t working correctly.

Mar 27

RJ45 Wiring for CAT5/CAT5e/CAT6

Cabling transmits information, and to get that information to where it needs to go the correct connections must be make to an RJ45 connector.  The cable run needs to terminate into a connector, and that connector needs a jack to plug into.  The Registered Jack 45 (RJ45) is a standard type of physical connector for networking cables used widely in networking.  Modern Ethernet cables feature a small plastic plug on each end of the cable.  That plug is inserted into the RJ45 jacks of Ethernet devices. 

RJ45 plugs feature eight (8) pins to which the copper cores of a cable interface electrically.  Each plug has eight locations (positions), spaced about 1mm apart.  Individual wires are inserted using special cable crimping tools.

Wiring for a RJ45 plug shown below.

 
 

Wiring for RJ45 Jack Sockets

The RJ45 port is the network port on a computer.  This socket has many names.  Also known as the Ethernet port, the network adapter, the network jack or the RJ45 jack.  A “port” is another name for a socket on a computer, as is “jack.” The RJ45 ports wired directly onto the network adapter inside the computer, and so is the cable interface to that device.  In this instance you will be wiring an RJ45 Wall Socket.  To wire your cable into the socket use an IDC insertion tool to insert each wire core into it’s corresponding terminal.

Wiring for RJ45 Jack Socket shown below.

Feb 14

Power over Ethernet (PoE) is a technology that lets network cables, such as CAT5e or CAT6, carry electrical power.

For example, a security camera would normally require two connections to be made when it is installed:

A network connection, in order to be able to communicate with a DVR and any display equipment.

A power connection, to provide electrical power the camera needs to operate.

However, if the camera is PoE-enabled, only the network connection needs to be made, as it will receive its electrical power from this cable as well.

Power over Ethernet reduces the number of cables required to connect a POE IP camera

Specifying Power over Ethernet brings many advantages to an installation:

Time and cost savings – by reducing the time and expense of having electrical power cabling installed.  Network cables do not require a qualified electrician to fit them, and can be located anywhere.

Flexibility – without being tethered to an electrical outlet, devices such as IP cameras and wireless access points can be located wherever they are needed most, and re-positioned easily if required.

Safety – PoE delivery is intelligent, and designed to protect network equipment from overload, under powering, or incorrect installation.

Reliability – PoE power comes from a central and universally compatible source, rather than a collection of distributed wall adapters.  It can be backed-up by an uninterruptible power supply, or controlled to easily disable or reset devices.

Scalability – having power available on the network means that installation and distribution of network connections is fast, simple and effective.

PoE has many applications such as:

VoIP phones – the original PoE application.  Using PoE means phones have a single connection to a wall socket, and can be remotely powered down, just like with older analogue systems.

IP cameras – PoE is now found throughout networked CCTV surveillance camera systems, where it enables fast deployment and easy re-positioning.

Wireless – Wifi & Bluetooth Access Points and RFID readers are commonly PoE compatible, to allow remote location away from AC outlets, and relocation following site surveys.

How to upgrade to PoE

Adding PoE to your network is straightforward, and there are two routes you can choose:

A PoE switch is a network switch that has Power over Ethernet injection built-in.  Simply connect other network devices to the switch as normal, and the switch will detect whether they are PoE-compatible and enable power automatically.

PoE switches are available to suit all applications, from low-cost unmanaged switches with a few ports, up to complex multi-port rack-mounted units with sophisticated management.

Adding Power over Ethernet using a POE Switch

A midspan (or PoE injector) is used to add PoE capability to regular non-PoE network links.  Midspans can be used to upgrade existing LAN installations to PoE, and provide a versatile solution where fewer PoE ports are required.  Upgrading each network connection to PoE is as simple as patching it through the midspan, and as with PoE switches, power injection is controlled and automatic.  Midspans are available as multi-port rack-mounted units or low-cost single-port PoE injectors.

 

Adding Power over Ethernet using a POE Midspan

 

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